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A third of Americans have missed a football game due to heavy tailgating

On bright and brisk falls mornings all over the country, you’ll find Americans gearing up for their favorite pastime — tailgating. While football, of course, is the main event, the tailgating subculture has become just as much of a mainstay of Saturday or Sunday mornings as the game itself. New research from YouGov revels an inside look at what Americans are drinking, their habits and how many participate. About 77% of respondents said they drink alcohol before the event, but 21% said they preferred to stay sober. One third of Americans said they drink alcohol at every tailgate they attend a game. College fans said that Bud Light, Samuel Adams, Blue Moon and Corona are the beers most likely to make an appearance in their game day coolers, while Jack Daniels, Baileys and Smirnoff are the preferred tailgating liquors. Frito-Lay’s chips, grilled Johnsonville sausages and cans of Campbells soup are the preferred snacks…

10 recipes for when it’s too hot out to cook

Maybe it’s too hot outside to fire up the skillet, or maybe it’s busy back to school season — either way, there seems to always be a reason not to cook. But don’t fret. Here are a few incredible recipes for when time is at a premium, but taste is still what you crave. No cook dinner recipes: Easy Vegan Spring Rolls A big dose of veggies in your diet goes down easy along with the perfect peanut dipping sauce. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/145241156707084471/ Mediterranean Tuna Lettuce Wraps A simple, no heat recipe perfect for long summer days. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/271201208787853399/ AVOCADO STRAWBERRY SPINACH WRAPS WITH POPPY SEED DRESSING There is nothing not to love about this incredible ingredient combo. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/4574037104887733/ Zucchini Noodles and Veggies Keep it light with these raw zucchini noodles. The vegetable packs tons of hydration so you’ll be sneaking more water into your diet — always a good thing in the heat. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/144115256804496683/…

College campuses with the best food

Every year the Princeton Review ranks America’s 382 best colleges, but students say, one category compiled for the list is becoming increasingly important. “In researching our guides to help high school students determine the best college for them, we have learned that food is becoming an increasingly important factor in their decision-making process,” said Rob Franek, Editor in Chief of The Princeton Review. Students are more health conscious then ever before, and they want to know that when they move to their new environment, they can continue to eat the diet they’re nutritionally and morally accustomed to — or looking to upgrade to. Many schools are committed to offering students healthy food options, but a few have gone above and beyond to offer sustainable and sometimes locally-sourced foods, nutrition classes, and extensive recycling and composting programs. Here are the top 10 ranked colleges for food, according to the students who dine there. University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA…

Get relief from the heat with these 10 hydrating fruits and veggies

According to the old rule of thumb, the average adult is supposed to drink 8 glasses of water every day. Some days that can seem downright impossible — and oh so bland. But here’s a tip for your water woes: You don’t have to drink all of that water. On a typical day, 20 percent or more of our water intake comes from solid foods like fruits and vegetables. While it’s still incredibly important to drink enough water, try incorporating some of these snacks into your daily routine. You’ll be checking off a few dietary boxes since all foods listed below are at least 90 percent water and they offer various other nutritional benefits. Cucumbers 96.7% water Cucumbers have the highest water content of any solid food, so they are perfect for summer salads on those sweltering days you can’t seem to stomach much else. Try mixing with watermelon and red onions for…

How to pick perfect produce: cucumber, zucchini, corn

We’re smack in the middle of summer, which means it’s prime produce season, but picking the best produce only comes with experience. Expert advice can certainly help. I visited a market to ask a local farmer how to choose the best pickles, cucumbers and corn. Watch as Becca gives us the pro tips. Zucchini Zucchini is a versatile summer staple. Pair it with pasta, fry it and serve with marinara, or make it in to a dish of trendy zoodles. When choosing zucchini remember these three things: Bigger isn’t better. Larger zucchini tend to have larger seeds and less flavor. Smaller is the way to go. Zucchini can be green, yellow or white in color, but always look for a rich saturation of color on top — the underside will be paler in color, and that’s okay. It’s just the side that didn’t face the sun. Stems are a good thing…

13 Iconic All-American foods the country can take credit for inventing

In American we’re always reminded that we should be thankful to other cultures for their contributions to our cuisine. And we are! (Where would we be without pizza?) Our country is a melting pot, and we — along with our stomaches — are all better for it. But that doesn’t mean we can’t take credit for a handful of delicious foods created right here on US shores. Sure, well respected chefs have stretched their creative culinary chops for decades giving us fancy, classic dishes like Oysters Rockefeller or Lobster Newberg, but let’s celebrate some of the simpler pleasures that Americans have made and then shared with the world. Pecan Pie: Pecan pie is practically a food group in the Southern states. To claim anyone else came up with this classic would be a crime. Early New Orleans settlers from France are often credited with inventing the dish after they were introduced to the pecan but by…

Add flavor to your meals with flowers

Edible flowers are a fun way to add color to a cocktail or a meal — just be sure what you’re grabbing for in your garden won’t make you sick. Denise Schreiber, edible flower expert and author of Eat Your Roses… Pansies, Lavender and 49 Other Delicious Flowers, has been a flower-as-food fan for decades. On a trip to England’s Mottisfont Abbey in 1999, Schreiber discovered rose petal ice cream and her interest blossomed from there. “They had this little cup of of the ice cream, and once you put it in your mouth, it was the aroma of the rose on your tongue and in your mouth. It was fantastic,” said Schreiber. “When I came back to the States I started looking for recipes.” The edible flower trend has recently been on the rise, largely thanks to social media — but harvesting flowers as food is nothing new. Flowers have been included in the human diet as far…

Here’s how much water you should actually be drinking

Hydrating your body is the most important thing you can do when the weather heats up. Most people undervalue the importance water plays in their overall health. From clearing skin to alleviating headaches, helping with weight loss and aiding in digestion, just increasing your water consumption can save you money on a lot of other medical bills down the road. If your pee is light enough you can barely notice it in the bowl, you’re doing a good job. But if you’re leaving behind a bowl full of what could be described as Chernobyl yellow, you might want to make adjustments. So how much water is enough? Just like calorie intake, that answer depends on the individual. The old adage said you should drink 8 glasses of water every day, but experts are beginning to cater their advice more to the individual. The Mayo Clinic says men should drink about 13 cups (3 liters) of water…

Cool down with mint this summer

When days heat up, a dish prepared with light, crisp mint leaves will taste delicious. The cooling, sweet flavor of mint goes great with both sweet and savory dishes — try it with anything from omelettes to ice cream. While mint is easy to find at your local market this time of year, it’s simple enough that you should be growing it yourself. Seriously. It’s one of the easiest herbs to grow. It’s fragrant and fast-growing and requires a very minimal time commitment. Plant in a  container on your porch for easiest maintenance, since mint grown directly in the garden soil has a tendency to spread in weed-like fashion. When choosing your location, find a spot where the plant will receive morning sunlight and partial afternoon shade. Mint is pretty resilient, so the natural rain water might be all you need, depending on where you live. Just keep an eye on the pot’s soil. If it starts…