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This is the dirtiest object in your home

If you’re curious what is the leading culprit in harboring bacteria in your home, you’re about to be grossed out. It’s not your shoes, your purse, or even the toilet. It’s an object you actually claim to use for cleaning — the kitchen sponge. A new study published in Scientific Reports found that the kitchen sponge, given its constant contact with water and food particles, is a good place for bacteria to grow. The results may be unsurprising, but the amount of bacteria is where we might underestimate the situation. Sponges showed a density of 54 billion bacteria per cubic centimeter — about equivalent to the number of bacteria in human feces. Yikes. “Despite common misconception, it was demonstrated that kitchen environments host more microbes than toilets,” the researchers wrote in the study. “This was mainly due to the contribution of kitchen sponges which were proven to represent the biggest reservoirs of active bacteria…

Experts say this is the best way to load silverware in a dishwasher

At some point it’s likely that you’ve opened a dishwasher to find your spouse or roommate loaded or rearranged it in a way you felt very strongly about. Chances are, how you load a dishwasher is nearly ingrained in you at this point, and whether grounded in truth or not, you have ideas about how the task is done most efficiently. This includes the decision to load silverware handle side up or handle side down. An ongoing poll on Houzz shows that people are split nearly 50/50 on the debate. The handle-side-up argument states that knives and forks can cause serious injuries to the person who will be unloading the machine. The handle-side-down camp insists that cutlery doesn’t get nearly as clean when it’s hidden in the basket, and also that handle side pointing down allows for less silverware overall to fit in each load. So which is the correct way? TipHero looked at various…

Stop bacteria from building up in your knife block

How to Clean a Knife Block Your floors, fridge, countertops and even oven make in on to your regular cleaning checklist, but there’s one surface in your kitchen you have probably never even touched. Consider your knife block. Sure, your knives are clean when you stow them in the slots, but dust and other debris can accumulate in these small spaces anyway. Despite our usual disregard for them, knife blocks should actually be washed and sanitized monthly if use frequently. Moisture can lead to mold and bacteria build-up, so to avoid larger cleaning issues, wash knives after each use and dry each thoroughly before sliding back into the knife block. Sanitize a knife block by following these simple steps: Step 1: Remove any knives stored in the block and set aside. Turn the block upside side over the sink and shake lightly to remove large debris. Step 2: Use a…

Kitchens Painted this Color Sell For More

As it turns out, when it comes to real estate, Americans value the color blue. Zillow’s 2017 Paint Colors Analysis found that the color can add value to home when painted in the appropriate rooms. In the recent study, Zillow analyzed photos of more than 32,000 homes that were sold in the United States to see how paint color could have affected the price. Homes with soft blue kitchens were found to have sold for about $1,809 more — especially in Charlotte, NC — while homes with yellow kitchens were sold for about $820 less on average. But the benefits of blue go beyond the kitchen. Interestingly, the bathroom color seemed to have the biggest impact in sales versus any other room. Homes with blue bathrooms, most often powder blue or periwinkle, sold for about $5,400 more than expected. White paint faired the worst here. White, eggshell or off-white saw values slip…

Rise of rainbow foods makes way for colorful ‘oil slick’ home trend

With all of the attention going toward rainbow and unicorn foods recently, it seems like colorful kitchen décor was the natural next step. Behold the “oil slick” trend. The iridescent jewel-toned color scheme mimics the sheen you can find on spilled oil in the sunlight. The opalescent luster with its brilliant pinks, purples, greens, blues and oranges is mesmerizing to look at. The trend started to take over fashion, beauty products and gardening accessories as well, but you can find it in the kitchen on glassware, cutlery, flasks, candles and more in a range of prices. Seen above: Swell water bottle, Galaxy Collection, Venus ($35) Hay, Rainbow Stainless Steel Tray ($23) 3-Piece Beta Flatware set ($27) Warp Iridescent Glass Vase, Tom Dixon ($353) Rainbow Party Cup ($16) Hampton Forge Tomodachi 10-piece Knife Set ($40) Stained Glass Tray,  Iridescent Blue and Bright Orange ($41) For information on the glazed iridescent porcelain tile backsplash, visit Dehtile.com.

The latest kitchen trend is dark and daring

The freshest thing in kitchens right now is daring, bold and black. While the classic color isn’t exactly new to home design, it’s recent rise in popularity is in contrast to the all-white look of the past few years. The bold hue is has been splashed across small kitchen accessories, walls, ceilings and sinks. The color is timeless and adds a certain elegance and goes with just about anything. See it on pots, pans, cabinets, backsplashes and countertops this year. A few black touches are easily welcomed into any style of decor from farmhouse to traditional or modern. The inky color is easy to incorporate into incorporate into your own home. A semi-gloss sheen will work best in most homes, with gloss working with both modern and retro vibes. Grab a few ghoulish accessories or go for a whole room remodel: 1. KitchenAid’s Artisan Black Tie 5-Quart Stand Mixer ($999.99) 2. Le Creuset Signature Enameled Cast-Iron 1…

15 Foods that Last Forever

This weekend we turn the clocks forward, signaling American households that it’s time for spring cleaning. But your annual overhaul shouldn’t be limited to just your clothing closets. Chances are, you could benefit from extra shelf space in your kitchen, too. It’s great to toss that old bag of candy and stale box of cereal, but you may encounter other items that aren’t so obvious. The expiration date food system is confusing. There are as many as a dozen different ways processed food companies stamp their goods to tell us when to toss and when to keep — Sell By, Use By, Best Before. The list goes on. A new voluntary initiative is being led by two major trade associations, Food Marketing Institute (FMI) and the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), that will streamline this process down to two phrases: “BEST If Used By” describes product quality, where the product may…