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A surprising number of adults think brown cows make chocolate milk

Seven percent of all adults in America believe that brown cows produce chocolate milk, according to an online survey commissioned by the Innovation Center of U.S. Dairy. That’s about 16.4 million misinformed folks who don’t know that chocolate milk is made of milk, cocoa and sugar. It’s jaw dropping for most of us, but for decades, educators and observers of all things agriculture have been telling us that we’re basically illiterate when it comes to what’s on our kitchen table. Many people don’t stop to consider where their food is grown or how it gets to the store — or, like chocolate milk, how it’s made. On study commissioned in the early ’90s found that nearly 1 in 5 adults didn’t know hamburgers are beef. Even more adults didn’t know basic farming facts and practices such as what animals eat or how big a U.S. farm typically is. Seemingly, not…

New American Heart Association Study Warns Against Coconut Oil

Superfood fans take caution. The American Heart Association recently released a report advising against consuming coconut oil. Coconut oil has seen a growing following in recent years as fans viewed it as an almost miracle-like fat and butter alternative, particularly with the paleo set. Touted as a superfood, cooking with the waxy white solid was said to burn fat, kill harmful microorganisms, curb hunger and improve cholesterol levels. But researchers recently found that coconut oil increased LDL (“bad”) cholesterol in seven out of seven trials, and they failed to see a difference between coconut oil and other popular oils high in saturated fat like butter, lard and beef fat. In fact, 82 percent of the fat in coconut oil is s saturated, while butter (63%), beef fat (50%) and pork lard (39%) contain less. Frank Sacks, lead author on the report, said he has no idea why people think coconut oil is healthy — I’s almost…

Kitchens Painted this Color Sell For More

As it turns out, when it comes to real estate, Americans value the color blue. Zillow’s 2017 Paint Colors Analysis found that the color can add value to home when painted in the appropriate rooms. In the recent study, Zillow analyzed photos of more than 32,000 homes that were sold in the United States to see how paint color could have affected the price. Homes with soft blue kitchens were found to have sold for about $1,809 more — especially in Charlotte, NC — while homes with yellow kitchens were sold for about $820 less on average. But the benefits of blue go beyond the kitchen. Interestingly, the bathroom color seemed to have the biggest impact in sales versus any other room. Homes with blue bathrooms, most often powder blue or periwinkle, sold for about $5,400 more than expected. White paint faired the worst here. White, eggshell or off-white saw values slip…

Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Eat On The Go

You just finished your work day but only have 30 minutes until you have to be across town for an evening event. Lunch has long worn off, and it will be hours until you get home. You’re going to have to eat this one on the run. You map out quick options along your route — the taco stand, the joint with pizza by the slice, the greasy burger restaurant. It’s just calories to get you through, but what does such careless eating do to your body? Research suggests that eating on the run is less physically satisfying. The study from the University of Surrey examined a group of women, both dieters and non-dieters. They were lead to believe the study was looking at how distraction affects food taste. The study broke the women into three group. The first, watched television while eating a cereal bar. The second had to walk around while…

Why Pizza Makes Us Happy

We didn’t need science to tell us that pizza makes us happy, but a recent study conducted by DiGiorno used facial recognition and emotion-tracking software to discover exactly why. And they found something unexpected. Partygoers were at their happiest when they were anticipating the pizza — not when they were actually eating it. The happiness chart shows a huge surge in satisfaction when the participants could smell the pizzas baking in the oven, and another even larger spike when the pizzas came out of the oven. In fact, happiness increased nearly 20 percent when partygoers knew the pizza was ready. This study is in support of other studies that have proved that just anticipating joyful experiences can make us happy. https://youtu.be/B4Kses_JilE

Instagram insights into food deserts

For some areas of the country, limited access to healthy and affordable food is the first problem in chain of linked public health concerns. These areas have become known as “food deserts,” and mostly consist of urban neighborhoods and rural towns. These types of areas are often associated with obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other diet-related issues reflective of poor eating habits, and are often measured by the distance people have to travel to get to a large, respectable grocery store. But what is harder to measure, is what these folks are actually eating at every meal. A recent study shed light on this information void by data mining Instagram posts — Finally some scientific  good coming out of all of those hours users spend artfully arranging plates of food, overnight oats and smoothie bowls. The researchers looked at 3 million Instagram posts tagged with food-related words such as “pizza” or “tea.” Next, the researchers,…

Four cups of coffee probably safe, new study confirms

Despite nearly two decades of conflicting research on how much coffee we can safely consume, people still love their morning cup of joe. And that would be fine, if our society stopped there. But collectively, we have a tendency to take things to the extreme. “Bring it!” responded one Los Angeles newscaster to an announcement that “the world’s strongest coffee” will now be available in the U.S. Just one cup of the South African based product, Black Insomnia (now also available on Amazon), has the equivalent of taking three Five Hour Energy shots. So how much is too much? Is there even a place for such a coffee in a responsible daily diet at all? A new study published in the journal of Food and Chemical Toxicology claims to have settled the great caffeine debate once and for all. Researchers combed through and compiled data from 5,000 articles published over a span of 15…

Scientists Approve Eating Avocado Every Day

Good news for avocado lovers everywhere. A review of scientific literature suggests that including an avocado in your daily diet may help prevent metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrom is the term used to describe a combination of risk factors that can occur together — like high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and a large waist measurement — that increase risk for heart disease and diabetes. The review was conducted by Iranian researchers and published in the journal Phythotherapy Research. It took into account 129 previously published studies on the health effects of avocado consumption. Most studies were done on the meaty, lighter green part of the fruit you’re used to eating, but a few dabbled in the health benefits of leaves, peels, pits and oil, as well. The researchers found that, of these, avocados have the greatest effect on cholesterol levels, but they helped fight other metabolic syndrome symptoms, too. In addition to their heart-healthy fats, avocados are…